groping, Story

HOLLA ON THE GO: Still Outraged

I was walking to the subway from my crossfit class and I felt a hard pinch on my left thigh. This medium height guy had pinched my thigh and walked away from me looking back to see my reaction. I was such in a state if shock and horror that such a thing happened to me in a huge mass of people. That was two years ago and I’m still outraged that it happened.

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2+

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Story, verbal

Sarah’s Story: Bystander fail

One day I had to visit the supermarket  - of course, as many people do, they visit the supermarket alone.

I walk into a busy Dunkin’ Donuts – mind you being that I am only a young adult not even looking 15, and as I walk in this man approaches me yelling “hey sweetie”.

I was in the store at the time and there are many woman around me, none of them decided to stop this harassment. He continued taunting me and saying sexual remarks, and I had to pull down my skirt and walk away quickly.

I am barely at the point of adulthood yet. I’m not developed in anyway that should indicate that I was an adult at the time. I found it disgusting than not even the mothers in the shop decided to help –  this wasn’t even on the streets and I was alone.

I've got your back!
1+

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Story, verbal

Kara’s Story: “I will not be infantalized!”

Guy walking up subway stairs, “Oh you got that nice baby face mmm…like a little baby,” walking opposite direction, giving me no chance to respond.
I would have said “I AM A GROWN ASS WOMAN AND I DO NOT APPRECIATE YOUR PETTY ADVANCES IN MY DIRECTION.”
I will not be infantalized!!!!

I've got your back!
4+

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Story, verbal

Mallorie’s Story: “This is not flattery or flattering”

I am a woman. I’m on my way out for the night. I am tall, thin, and wearing a skirt with heels. These are all simple facts.

I am young. I live in New York City. I type this on my smart phone. My phone tried to autocorrect live to love. That is also true.

I get onto the train. Two men enter. I have on headphones because I saw this coming while I was getting ready an hour earlier. One sits – the other stops and leers. He sits – gets his friend’s attention and motions to me – obviously. They leer together. They talk while looking directly at me. If not for my noise canceling headphones – I could hear them. I am choosing not to – yet I am still becoming angry.

Eventually – I choose to walk to another section of the car to sit. The man across from me is looking at me every time I look up.

Let me stop you right there. This is not flattery or flattering. I am not conceited nor do I think they are looking at me because I am a wonderful, beautiful woman worthy of love and respect. I chose the word leer for a reason.

I am a woman. I love to dress up. I live in New York City. And sometimes I walk around un-chaperoned. This becomes a problem.

This becomes a constant of headphones in my ears. This becomes me clutching my keys in my pocket everywhere I go. This becomes I’m a bitch because I don’t say thank you to their catcalls. This becomes I was asking for it because I’m wearing a skirt and I am a woman alone.

This is a problem. A legitimate one. This is conditioning. This is my worry every time I leave the house. This is what Margaret Atwood meant when she said “Men are afraid that women will laugh at them; women are afraid that men will kill them.” This is reality. This runs through every woman’s head. This is not just a lack of being “raised right.” This is a lack of respect. This is harassment.

Men. Tell other men this is unacceptable. Women. Be yourself – dress however you please – stay safe – speak out. When someone harasses you – tell someone else.

Keep talking.
Keep spreading awareness.

Stop street harassment.

I've got your back!
3+

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Story, verbal

Sarah’s Story: Slankets upon slankets

I was walking into the Time Warner Center. A group of men started catcalling me, and following me. Business as usual. Then one actually said (verbatim), “Damn girl! You better get yourself inside! I mean it, like, I’m not even bein’ nice. I mean something’s gonna happen to you if you stay out here! I mean, damn, you’re gonna get raped, like seriously!”

I thought I was a veteran of receiving gross comments and threats. The worst part is that I feel like my face and body betrayed me — that I was noticeably jarred by their comments — I hate knowing they may have derived satisfaction from my reaction.

Note: I was wearing a long winter coat that covered up most of my body. How many slankets does a girl have to pile on to make this BS stop?

I've got your back!
2+

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groping, Story

HOLLA ON THE GO: Run away creeper

Someone grabbed my butt while I was walking down the street and then ran off.

I felt totally violated.

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2+

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assault, Story

Em’s Story: “I’m still angry”

I had literally just walked out of my apartment to head to the park, when I walked past a group of maybe 10 guys headed in the other direction. They were quiet, which was a little weird because there were 10 of them. I passed the last one, and all of a sudden one of them grabs my hair and yanks down, yelling something. I could hear my neck crack in my ears as he grabbed my head. The hair tie in my hair was ripped out! I was so stunned. They just walked away laughing. And I didn’t do anything, I was just too shocked. All of those come-backs and planned escape plans, nothing would have worked being attacked from behind. I didn’t even chase after them. I went straight back up into my apartment to grab another hair tie, and then headed out again like nothing happened. But a day later, I’m still angry. Definitely at those kids, and almost kind of at myself for not knowing what to do.

I've got your back!
6+

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Story, verbal

Cindy’s Story: “Headphones have become my best friend”

Yes there are the usual cat calls we get in NYC which I can’t stand. Which is why headphones have become my best friend (during the day). This morning waiting for the bus on Church Ave I see this man from about a block away staring at me, and you know how you could just tell and just eyeing me up and down like I was a piece of meat.

I was so angry inside that I asked him “What are you looking at? Why are you looking at me nasty ass man?” He continued to deny it and you know how it goes – they start insulting you & the way you look. I did not care, I kept going. Older women were around me and did not say a word, they kept on looking at me as if I was wrong.

Maybe it is a cultural thing, but as a Colombian American I will not stand for it. I just couldn’t keep quiet this morning. I kept telling him that he is mad that hes nasty and then he said that I shouldnt be wearing those “TIGHT PANTS” OH? MY RUNNING PANTS? I SCREAMED. Now that PISSED me off the most. How dare he.

That is why men feel the right to say shit to us and look at us. I feel as though this East Flatbush area is the worst for these cat calls and nasty men who are disrespectful. I am so annoyed by feeling scared to come out.  It is ridiculous and this needs to be stopped. I want more men in these areas and for women to understand that they need to have a voice and people like me that I don’t want to be scared anymore.

I've got your back!
10+

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