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Victoria’s story: Takes the cake.

Living in Harlem of course I’ve been disrespected my random men on the streets many times, but this one takes the cake! I’m 7 months pregnant, I enter a Dunkin donuts around 10 pm with some serious cravings and a man states me down in the most disgusting way. As I turn around to leave he starts following me and telling me I’m pretty and can he talk to me. He follows me for 3 blocks, now im getting worried because I’m getting closer to my building. I finally stop and scream “I’m pregnant!!” he smiles and says I know that. I simply to him “please stop following me, I’m not interested.” Thank god he did!

I've got your back!
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Heather’s story: Greetings From Greenpoint!

I have been out of touch for a while but today I met a chap I thought you would like to share with your readers. I made his acquaintance on Manhattan Avenue this afternoon— and ended up learning more about his private life than I cared to know.

To predicate: I strike up/participate in a number of conversations while pounding north Brooklyn’s streets. Not only do I enjoy meeting my neighbors face to face, but this is a rather vital means of gather intelligence/content for my site. And today I learned some rather interesting (and highly personal) information from this fellow. Namely that he was planning on doing some pounding of his own.

After inquiring as to whether I was on drugs or in need of them (No thanks, I’m quite “off” as is.) my new friend confided the following:

You know what I am going to do when I get home? “Choke the chicken”. While thinking of you.

That’s when I took the attached photograph of this charmer. Follows is what he had to say about this turn of events:

So what are you going to do? Send it to the police and have me arrested?

To answer his question: I DID send it to the police. In fact, I sent it directly to our commanding officer so he can have it handy lest he/our Finest get(s) any (more) complaints about this horndog’s avocation of choice.


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Help us uncover the truth about violence in New York City’s subways: Volunteer researchers needed!

New Yorkers for Safe Transit (NYFST) is looking for volunteers to conduct a peoples’ survey of mass transit riders especially women, LGBTQ individuals, low income and people of color to uncover the real story. We are creating a core of volunteer researchers. Join them for an orientation meeting and training:

WEDNESDAY MARCH 28, 6:30 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.

At the NYFST office
26 Court Street
Suite 505
Brooklyn, NY 11242

RSVP to [email protected]

Hollaback! NYC along with RightRides and Girls for Gender Equity co-founded New Yorkers for Safe Transit in 2008.  The coalition is dedicated to eliminating harassment and assaults, particularly gender- or discrimination-based, on public transportation in New York City.

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DR’s story: Is street harassment a ‘cultural’ thing?

This isn’t a story about harrassment. Not exactly. But it is an important story to tell, nonetheless. I have a dear friend that I have known for over 10 years. She is beautiful and adorable and has a bit of extra weight on her. She decided a few years ago to put herself in situations to date latinos because they appreciated “all body types,” unlike many other cultures, such as caucasions, like us. I was and am supportive of my friend’s decisions, not because I think she needs to date latinos, but because she is happy.

That said, we recently had one of our biggest arguments that we have ever had. We were discussing catcalls or whistles from men. I noted my extreme distaste with this and complete lack of acceptibility on my part. She, however, completely defended this behavior from “certain cultures” because it is “meant” as compliments. This was code to say that it is and should be acceptable for Latino men to verbally provide “statements” to women, because they are “compliments.” In my attempts at rebuttal, I was, quite honestly, very emotional and not as effective as I’d like to have been.

I know that my friend is blinded by her insecurities and adoption of a foreign culture and love of a good man. But I am still angry with her for supporting this type of behavior from men.

At BEST catcalls may be complimentary, but still put women in a place of objectification. At worst, it is clearly sexual harrassment, and putting women in potentially dangerous situations. It is about power. And when a someone creates an environment where another person is uncomfortable, whether meant as a compliment or not, is unacceptable.

I would truly like to hear from Latinas. In my attempt to see my friend’s perspective, and explore the possibility that I have more to learn, I would like to know how hispanic women feel about this behavior. Do you feel this is a compliment? If so, do you feel any danger in these situations? Do you find that you avoid these environments? Are you offended, and if so, do you let them know?

Thank you for listening.

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Sydnie’s story: Intimidation

A man walked up to me while I was on the subway platform. He got extremely close to me, face to face, and gave me dirty looks, and then quickly walked away. This was clearly to intimidate me, but it happened so quickly I couldn’t do anything about it.

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Sydnie’s Story: Trying to intimidate

A man walked up to me while I was on the subway platform. He got extremely close to me, face to face, and gave me dirty looks, and then quickly walked away. This was clearly to intimidate me, but it happened so quickly I couldn’t do anything about it.

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Ally and Sonia’s Story: “No more staying silent”

My girlfriend and I were on the train simply being ourselves and holding hands. This scummy man wearing a leather jacket and motorcycle boots was staring and giving us dirty looks until his stop came, and as he was leaving the train, in the middle of the day, stops, looks at us, and says, “maybe it’s time to try sucking some dick.” It’s so frustrating when at least once a week we get on the subway and someone tries to makes us uncomfortable with being out and proud whether it’s staring, pulling their rosaries out, or calling us “emo faggots” or whatever. We have the right to ride the subway and walk the streets being ourselves and we have had enough. No more staying silent. Always speaking up and defending our right to be who we are from now on. We are both very proud of who we are and we refuse to be harassed again without fighting back. Thank you Hollaback! You are making a difference!

with love,
sonia and ally from brooklyn new york

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Kat’s Story: Stop staring

I was going to a club with my best friend one night a couple months ago. I had decided to wear shorts. On the train I was sitting at the end of the bench, my friend was next to me, and this guy got on and sat next to her. As I’m talking to my friend, I notice the guy leaning forward but I wasn’t looking at his face. Then he starts leaning over pretty close to us, like he was going to ask us something, so I look up and he is staring at my legs in “that way”.
I just moved over more, away from him, and my friend kind of shielded me with her body, but he wouldn’t stop leering at my legs. I felt really uncomfortable, and there were other people around us that noticed what he was doing. One lady even laughed. It was kind of embarrassing, and I didn’t know what to say, so I just tried to ignore him. After several minutes of intense staring at me, he finally got off the train. He was still staring at me as the train pulled away from the station.
I was pretty creeped out, and I’m glad my friend was with me because I feel like if she hadn’t been there he might have tried to touch me or something. Ugh.

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Kate’s Story: Demeaning

I was waiting for the uptown C train at 155th street, to go to the CUMC campus to do homework. A man approached me, asking if the train went to 168th street and how many stops it took. I gave him the information, being as short as possible, because I hate when people talk to me when I am waiting for the train. He says thank you, and says that I’m pretty and walks away. A few moments later, I see someone quickly approaching me through my peripherals. I turn to look, and it seemed that they were wearing tan pants. As they got closer,I saw it was the same man as before, with NO pants, masturbating with the most disgusting, repulsive and creepy look on his face. I screamed, ran upstairs, and reported the incident to the station attendant, who contacted the police. I waited until after a few trains went, and other people were present to get onto the train. It was such a horrifying and demeaning experience. I wish I had been able to take his picture.

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Join Us For Our “I’ve Got Your Back” Campaign Launch!

Join us as we celebrate international anti-street harassment week and the launch of our new “I’ve Got Your Back” campaign on March 22, 2012 at The Suffolk. In honor of the event, recording artist BLAKE will perform and debut the release of her new music video “Creepin” about street harassment. You can RSVP for the event here.

Like everything we do here at Hollaback! — the launch of the “I’ve Got Your Back” campaign wouldn’t have been possible without your support.  Literally. Last July, after being rejected for grant funding, 268 of you banned together and donated $25,696 to bring this campaign to life. On March 22nd, we are proud to announce the campaign will launch.

The “I’ve Got Your Back” campaign will provide real-time relief to those who are harassed by carrying a simple message: “If you see someone being harassed, ask them if they are OK and if there is anything you can do to help.” We’ll be relaunching our iPhone and Droid apps and adding new features to our site to show people how to intervene when they witness street harassment and to celebrate when they do.

The campaign changes the power dynamics of street harassment by showing harassers that women and LGBTQ individuals are not alone, and it reminds all of us that we have a role to play in ending street harassment in our day to day lives.

Join us as we celebrate the launch of this exciting new initiative!  Tickets are only $5 at the door, and you can RSVP for the event here.

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